Diploma in Biodynamic Agriculture launched in Cape Town

The Biodynamic Agricultural Association of Southern Africa (BDAASA) has recently launched a 2-year, work based Diploma in Biodynamic Agriculture, which is held in Cape Town, South Africa.

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The course is presented as a work-based learning programme with prominent farmers in Wellington, Swellendam, Paarl, Hemel-and-Aarde, Stellenbosch and Wolseley in the Western Cape.

It aims to equip students to farm according to biodynamic principles, which is an agro ecological (environmentally friendly) method founded on the philosophies of Dr. Rudolph Steiner around 1924 as a response to declining soil fertility and poor crops. The biodynamic approach recognises the impact of natural forces, such as the moon, on production and aims to create an environment where farmers are working with, instead of against nature. It includes the use of compost and natural preparations to boost soil fertility and therefor production.

The course which was started in October 2014, currently has 10 students who have enrolled. Students can start at any time and in addition to course work and the attendance of seminars, will work closely with well-established biodynamic farmers on their various farms gaining valuable hands-on experience.

For more information see BDAASA’s profile and contact details on the Green Africa Directory.

One Response to “Diploma in Biodynamic Agriculture launched in Cape Town”

  1. Malcolm Stuart May 16, 2015 at 12:03 pm #

    Concratulations to BDAASA; The ‘organic’ movement shouldn’t have to battle so hard against the odds.

    Members of the public are far too reluctant to acknowledge the follies of modern food production (pesticide residues etc.)

    In turn, government won’t undertake their responsibility to at least share our concerns until there are
    queues of consumers at ‘organic’ outlets, and a buzz of discontent at the shortage in supply. then, perhaps government will ‘level the playing fields’ (indulge in agricultural research, pay for ‘organic
    certification’ and so on).

    How can we persuade consumers that there is a undeniable moral case for them AND their children ?

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